shutterstock_1723848115_2jo0GfW..jpeg (shutterstock_1723848115.webp)Medial collateral ligament bursitis, also known as MCL bursitis, is one of the most common knee injuries that cause patients to visit an orthopedist. It causes serious pain and swelling on the inside of the knee joint, and if you've been affected by an MCL injury, you may be familiar with the discomfort and loss of mobility that comes with it.

MCL injuries and other knee injuries are common in athletes, especially those who play contact sports -- but how much do you really know about medial collateral ligament tears? Do you know how they happen, and what your options are for treatment?

As one of the top orthopedic surgeons in the Atlanta area, Dr. Trevor Turner is experienced in providing the latest MCL tear treatments. Using leading-edge technology and techniques, Dr. Turner can help you get back to your active lifestyle as quickly and safely as possible.

Here are some things every patient should know about medial collateral ligament bursitis:

What Are Collateral Ligament Injuries?

The knee is made up of three bones -- the femur (thighbone), tibia (shinbone), and patella (kneecap). These bones are connected by ligaments, which help to stabilize the knee joint. There are four main ligaments in the knee:

  • The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is located on the inner knee (the inside of the knee joint) and helps to stabilize the knee when it's bent.
  • The lateral collateral ligament (LCL) is located on the outside of the knee joint and also helps to stabilize the knee when it's bent.
  • The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is located in the middle of the knee joint and helps to stabilize the knee when it's straight.
  • The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is located in the back of the knee joint and also helps to stabilize the knee when it's straight.

The MCL and LCL are known as the collateral ligaments, while the ACL and PCL are known as the cruciate ligaments.

Dr. Turner feels strongly about using the most conservative, least invasive treatment options first. However, he will develop an MCL bursitis treatment plan that's specifically tailored to your needs in order to help you recover as quickly and completely as possible.

Preventing MCL Bursitis

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These elastic soft tissues can be injured in a variety of ways, causing them to become stretched like a worn-out rubber band, torn, or completely detached from the bone. Collateral ligament injuries like a torn MCL are among the most common knee injuries, which can range from mild MCL tears to a more severe tear.

What Is MCL Bursitis?

MCL bursitis is a condition that occurs when the bursa -- a small, fluid-filled sac that acts as a cushion between the bone and soft tissue -- becomes inflamed. The bursa is located near the MCL, and when it becomes irritated or inflamed, it can cause pain and swelling in the knee joint.

Bursitis is related to tears in the MCL, but it's important to note that not all MCL tears will result in bursitis. However, if you have a torn ligament, there's a higher chance that you'll also develop bursitis.

How Do Most MCL Tears Happen?

MCL injuries can occur due to a direct blow to the knee, such as when an athlete is tackled in football, soccer, or other contact sports. A medial collateral ligament tear can also occur due to overuse, such as in those who play sports requiring jumps and runners who constantly put stress on their knees.

MCL bursitis is often caused by repetitive motions that put stress on the knee joint, such as squatting or kneeling. It can also be caused by direct trauma to the knee, such as a fall or collision.

What Are Some Common MCL Bursitis Symptoms?

The most common symptom of MCL bursitis is pain on the inside of the knee joint. This knee pain is often worse when you bend your knee, and you may also hear a popping sound or feel a snapping sensation.

If you have MCL bursitis, you may also:

  • Experience swelling in the injured knee
  • Feel stiff in the affected knee
  • Notice a decrease in your range of motion

How Do You Treat MCL Injuries?

The treatment for MCL bursitis will depend on the severity of your symptoms. When you visit Dr. Turner for a diagnosis, he'll perform a physical exam and may order X-rays or an MRI to determine the extent of your injury.

If you have mild MCL bursitis, Dr. Trevor Turner may recommend:

  • Rest: You'll need to take a break from any activity that's causing pain in your knee. This includes sports, running, and other forms of exercise.
  • Ice: Apply ice to your knee for 20 minutes at a time, several times a day. This will help to reduce swelling and pain.
  • Compression: Use an elastic compression bandage to help reduce swelling.
  • Elevation: Keep your affected leg elevated above your heart to help reduce swelling.
  • Anti-inflammatory medication: Over-the-counter knee pain medication, such as ibuprofen, can help to reduce pain and swelling.

If your MCL bursitis is more severe, Dr. Trevor Turner may recommend:

  • Knee bracing: A knee brace can help to keep your affected knee stable and protect it from further injury.
  • Physical therapy: Physical therapy exercises can help to strengthen the muscles around your knee, which can in turn help to support your ligaments.
  • PRP injections: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections can help to accelerate your recovery time by using your body's natural growth factors.
  • MCL Surgery: In some cases, your knee may require surgery to repair a torn ligament or remove damaged tissue.

Dr. Turner feels strongly about using the most conservative, least invasive treatment options first. However, he will develop an MCL bursitis treatment plan that's specifically tailored to your needs in order to help you recover as quickly and completely as possible.

Preventing MCL Bursitis

There are several things you can do to help prevent MCL bursitis, such as:

  • Wearing appropriate shoes: Wearing shoes that offer good support can help to reduce the stress on your knees.
  • Stretching and strengthening exercises: Exercises that stretch and strengthen the muscles around your knee can help to reduce your risk of injury.
  • Cross-training: Participating in a variety of different activities can help to reduce the risk of overuse injuries.
  • Adequate warm-up: Make sure to warm up before participating in any physical activity.

Where Is the Top Orthopedic Knee Doctor Near Me?

If you're concerned about your risk of developing MCL bursitis, or if you're experiencing pain in your knee, make an appointment to see Dr. Trevor Turner. As the leading orthopedic healthcare provider in Peachtree City, GA, he'll be able to diagnose your condition and develop a treatment plan that's right for you.

To learn more about how leading-edge treatments can help you meet your recovery goals, contact Dr. Trevor Turner's office in Peachtree City, GA. To get started on your way to living pain-free, schedule your first appointment with Dr. Turner today.